Klin: a Town by the Big Road
New center – Historical center – Church of the Assumption – Museum of New Year tree ornaments – Railway station
29
0

The life of Klin, a typical town for the Greater Moscow Area, has always depended on roads. From the start (the town was first registered in 1317), it was a fortress of the Grand Duchy of Tver on the road to the Golden Horde. Later (since 1492) it became a fortress of the Grand Duchy of Moscow on the road to Novgorod. During that time, Klin was devastated by the Tatars, princes from neighboring regions, and Oprichniki (guardsmen) of Ivan the Terrible. During later years (1702), it served as a post station on one of delivery routes and a train station of Russia’s first railroad (1851) from Moscow to St. Petersburg. Highway M10 and Oktyabrskaya Railway still run through the center of the town and residents of Klin still regard Moscow and Tver as close neighbors.

1. New center
  • Church of the Icon of the Mother of God “Joy of All Who Sorrow”
Aleksandr Menshikov
Entering the town via the highway that transforms itself into a chain of urban streets, we leave the mansion of Tchaikovsky on the right-hand side. At the corner of Tikhaya Street, you will see a former transit prison built at the beginning of the 19th century and the Church of St. Tikhon of Zadonsk (1907). The highway turns into a boulevard or, more precisely, embraces the boulevard from both sides. It’s better to park your car somewhere around here and continue with a walking tour of the town. The shortest way to the center is to the right, down Liteynaya Street. However, there’s something worth seeing on the left side of the street as well. Firstly, there is a war memorial – a must for every Soviet town or city, and especially one that survived the Battle of Moscow – with a truly touching statue of an army doctor. Secondly, there is the Church of the Joy of All Who Sorrow (1861), secluded in a quiet garden. Thirdly, there is a half-dead factory of medical glass, launched back in 1848. Its chimneys have been bent with age. The factory was founded by the famous Aleksandr Menshikov, the owner of the nearby Alexandrovka mansion – the one whose diplomatic blunders and poor command lead to the defeat in the Crimean War.
2. Historical center
  • Old shopping street
In the Middle Ages, the Kremlin of Klin was located here. In the 18th century, it was a suburb populated by coachmen. Since 1795, it became the center of a district town of Moscow Governorate.
Liteynaya Street (or the road parallel to it, Gagarin Street) will take you to the historical center, clinging to the Sestra River. In the Middle Ages, the Kremlin of Klin was located here. In the 18th century, it was a suburb populated by coachmen. Since 1795, it became the center of a district town of Moscow Governorate. At the square, you will see an extremely scenic shopping street (1885) built in the Old Moscow style. Nearby, there is the Cathedral of Trinity (1836), slowly shaking off the disguise of a Soviet-time recreation center. Behind it, the Church of the Resurrection (1712) and a belfry (1762) are hiding. Wooden predecessors of these temples used to be part of the local kremlin. Around them, there is a bunch of old houses, thinned out by the war, including the famous “shop under the clock” at the corner of Lenin and Liteynaya Streets – a former roadside tavern – and the red-brick District Treasury at the beginning of Papivin Street.
3. Church of the Assumption
  • Church of the Assumption
House No. 4 is the oldest building in Klin, 200 years ago it belonged to the mayor
From the shopping street, you should take a walk across the Sestra, following Papivin Street that looks like the old times (house No. 4 is the oldest building in Klin, 200 years ago it belonged to the mayor) towards the Church of the Assumption built in 1572 – either by local people to honor victims of Ivan the Terrible’s Oprichniki (guardsmen) or by Ivan himself, upon a sudden repentance. The temple got its unusual look after the renovation in the 1960’s. Perhaps it was an attempt to bring back the extinct architectural style of the Grand Duchy of Tver.
4. Museum of New Year tree ornaments
  • Museum of New Year tree ornaments
Like every self-respecting town in the Greater Moscow Area, Klin has its own brand in crafts that originated from that old glass factory
If you follow Lenin Street, you can find a picturesque Klin farmstead at 4 Staroyamskaya Street. But don’t be misled by the Old Russian looks – the farmstead was built in 2008. Like every self-respecting town in the Greater Moscow Area, Klin has its own brand in crafts that originated from that old glass factory: the farmstead is occupied by the only Russian museum of New Year tree ornaments, including 10 exhibition halls and 2 workshops, specializing in glassblowing and arts. However, the ornaments displayed at the museum are not limited to the ones made of glass (a cotton-wool Father Frost is an indispensable part of the exhibition), and glass objects are not only ornaments: there is a separate hall dedicated to all kinds of vessels and vials made by the local factory. All the goods are well-wrought. Both young kids and experts in history and ethnography will enjoy the museum.
5. Railway station
  • Railway station
The viaduct is a great place for rail-spotting fans – it’s easy to spot a commuter train, a Sapsan or some other express train.
From the farmstead, Novoyamskaya Street will take you straight to the bus station, adjacent to the railway station and metropolitan shopping malls. The train station, standing on an island between the tracks, was erected in 1851. Along with other stations on the railway line built by Nicholas I, it belongs to the first generation of Russian train stations – and naturally, that’s what makes it so outstanding. Right on the platform, there is a small bust of Tchaikovsky: Klin is the town where the great composer spent the last years of his life. 

Where to eat


Klin residents are fond of the café Alex (4 Dzerzhinskogo Street) with Pan-European cuisine and modest prices compared to Moscow. Best pizzas are served at Dolce Vita (26 Gagarin Street). Moreover, it’s worth remembering that about 10–15 years ago, local beer was popular all over the country (and it’s still being brewed here).

Where to stay


There are not so many hotels in Klin. You can choose among a few mini-hotels and apartment hotels. The most popular ones are Klever and Akvamarin (but they aren’t cheap – 2.700 rubles a night or more) or apartment hotel Uyutny Dom (although the road that leads there is not so nice).

How to get here


By car: 86 kilometers down M10 Highway.
By public transport: 
- Commuter train from the Leningradsky Railway Station. The trip takes 1 to 2 hours
- Bus from the Vodny Stadion Metro station – running roughly every 30 minutes, but there’s a risk to get stuck in the infamous traffic jams on Leningradskoye Highway. If the traffic is good, the bus trip will take about 1.5 hours.

Written by Ilya Buyanovksy
Карта: 
29
0

Комментарии (0)

Вы нашли ошибку в следующем тексте

Просто нажмите кнопку "Отправить отчет". Вы также можете оставить комментарий